NEW YORK: The Financial Times today announces the appointment of David Gelles as US media and marketing correspondent. Previously, he was a San Francisco-based technology correspondent, covering social media, e-commerce and e-books. He served as a web content developer for FT.com prior to that.

Gelles will move to New York in due course to cover long-established content and distribution companies, disruptive digital media innovators and the wider marketing industry.

Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson, media editor for the Financial Times, commented, “David possesses a deep understanding of the changes underway in the media landscape and brings a fresh perspective to the beat having covered the digital media revolution from the West Coast. He has a knack for breaking news and a reputation for good judgment, speed, accuracy and style. David will deliver the competitive and sophisticated coverage that our readers expect in print and online.”

Before joining the FT, Gelles served as the small business reporter for the Miami Herald and contributed to the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times and Forbes. He studied at Boston University and University of California’s Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism.

Gelles replaces Kenneth Li, who is returning to Reuters as its Editor-in-Charge of Technology, Media and Telecoms.

- ends -

For further information please contact:

Darcy Keller

Head of Communications, the Americas

T: +1 212-641-6614

E: darcy.keller@ft.com

About the Financial Times:

The Financial Times, one of the world’s leading business news organisations, is recognised internationally for its authority, integrity and accuracy. Providing essential news, comment, data and analysis for the global business community, the newspaper, printed at 23 print sites across the globe, has a daily circulation of 378,497 (ABC figures July 2010), while FT.com has over 2.6 million registered users and 149,047 digital subscribers. The FT’s combined print and paid digital circulation is 563,026 (Deloitte assured, July 2010) and it has a combined print and online average daily readership of 1.9 million people worldwide (PwC assured, November 2009).

Highlights

FT History Timeline

125 years of FT history

How To Spend It

Website of worldly pleasures