The Financial Times today announces the launch of a new press cuttings service on FT.com, which enables users to search and view digital images of FT articles as they appeared in the newspaper. The service has been developed to support the extension of the FT’s digital licence to include digital images of FT newspaper articles, previously licensed by the Newspaper Licensing Agency (NLA).

The press cuttings are available at www.ft.com/presscuttings. They form part of the FT.com ‘metered’ access model, where registered users can access up to 10 articles per month at no cost and unlimited access to articles requires a premium or corporate subscription. The press cuttings section of the site allows users to:

• Search for FT newspaper articles from all five print editions of the paper

• Use advanced options to search by edition, author, date and section

• Save searches for future reference and set-up alerts based on specified search criteria

• View a digital image of a single article and/or as it appeared on the page

• Send article headline links to colleagues or clients with annotated comments

Following a consultation period with customers and stakeholders, the consolidation of the Financial Times’ digital licensing will provide direct licence holders with unlimited access to FT journalism. The content will be accessible through FT.com as well as media monitoring services, press cuttings agencies and news aggregation services – for one price*.

“Many of our 800 corporate customers have asked for the ability to search for FT newspaper articles. This new functionality is in direct response to their request. It is also being launched in advance of the NLA licensing changes: as of 1 July 2010, the NLA will cease issuing new licences for digital images or scanning of FT articles,” said Caspar de Bono, managing director of B2B.

He continued: “We have worked closely with the NLA and Press Cutting Agencies to implement this change. The consultation process we started in February has provided us with detailed insight into how press cuttings are used by PR professionals.”

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* Buying an FT Corporate Licence does not include a subscription to third party services

For further information, please contact:

Tom Glover, Financial Times, +44 20 7775 6840 or tom.glover@ft.com

Notes to Editors:

The Financial Times introduced a direct licence in April 2008 for rights for groups of ten or more users to have unlimited access to Financial Times journalism on FT.com and via 29 other channel partners (a list of agents is available at www.ft.com/corporate). The FT licence has been designed to allow users of Financial Times content to pay for content independently of the cost of the technology platform it is accessed via. The price of the FT licence is based on the number of users not the technology platforms used to access the content.

FT articles are available on FT.com for free on a limited basis. Registered users can access up to 10 articles a month at no cost. Unlimited access requires a subscription. This can be done either by purchasing a single subscription to FT.com for an individual’s personal use. Or by buying a corporate subscription for two or more people to have access rights to FT.com.

Anyone can use the email linking tool on FT.com to share a link to an article on FT.com. There is no limit on the number of links that can be sent and it is free to send the link. The recipient can then access the article on FT.com as either a registered user or as a subscriber.

The NLA currently has a mandate to licence the photocopying of newspaper articles from the Financial Times and the rights to view digital images of newspaper cuttings on eClips. The NLA will retain the mandate to licence photocopying.

About the Financial Times:

The Financial Times, one of the world’s leading business news organisations, is recognised internationally for its authority, integrity and accuracy. Providing essential news, comment, data and analysis for the global business community, the newspaper, printed at 23 print sites across the globe, has a daily circulation of 399,862 (ABC figures May 2010), while FT.com has over 2 million registered users and 126,281 digital subscribers. The FT has a combined print and online average daily readership of 1.9 million people worldwide (PwC audited figures, November 2009)

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